Cyber Chip

Grades 1-3: 
  1. Read, commit to, and sign the Level I Internet Safety Pledge. (BSA Cyber Chip blue card)
  2. Watch the video “Bad Netiquette Stinks.” (NetSmartz.org/scouting )
  3. Play the Router’s Birthday Surprise Interactive Adventure, and print the completion certificate to give to your den leader. (NetSmartz.org/scouting )
  4. Show and tell your family, den leader, den, or pack what you have learned.
Grades 4-5: 
  1. Read, commit to, and sign the Level I Internet Safety Pledge. (BSA Cyber Chip blue card)
  2. Watch the video “The Password Rap” and another video of your choosing. (NetSmartz.org/scouting)
  3. As an individual or with your den, use the Teachable Recipes to demonstrate Internet safety rules to your den leader, den, or pack. (NetSmartz.org/scouting)
  4. Discuss with your unit leader the acceptable standards and practices for using allowed electronic devices, such as phones and games, at your meetings and other Scouting events.

Note: All Cyber Chips will expire annually. Each Scout will need to “recharge” the chip by going back to the Netsmartz Recharge area. This space will hold new information, news, and a place for the Scout to recommit to net safety and netiquette. Then, with the unit leader, the Scout can add the new date to the Cyber Chip card or certificate.

National Den Award

The National Den Award recognizes dens that conduct a quality, year-­‐round program. It can be earned only once in any 12 months. The 12-­‐month period (charter year, calendar year, etc.) is determined by the pack committee. 

Service projects, field trips, character development, and Cub Scout camping are areas that are emphasized. Dens earn the award as a team, not as individual den members. The recognition is a ribbon for the den flag or den doodle. 

Requirements 

  • Have at least 50 percent of the den’s Tiger, Cub, or Webelos Scouts attend two den meetings and one pack meeting or activity each month of the year. 

  • Complete six of the following during the year: 
    1. Use the denner system within the den. 
    2. In a Tiger den, use shared leadership and rotate the boy/adult host team. 
    3. Have 50 percent of the den go on three field trips per year. A field trip may be used in place of a den meeting. 
    4. As a den, attend a Cub Scout day camp, Cub Scout or Webelos Scout resident camp, or a council family camping event with at least 50 percent of the den membership. 
    5. Conduct three den projects or activities leading to a discussion of the Scout Law. 
    6. Have 50 percent of the den earn at least three elective adventure loops or adventure pins. 
    7. Have 50 percent of the den participate in a patriotic ceremony or parade. 
    8. Have 50 percent of the den participate in a den conservation/resource project. 
    9. Have 50 percent of the den participate in at least one den service project. 

National Summertime Awards
Pack: The pack can qualify for the National Summertime Pack Award certificate and streamer by planning and conducting three pack activities—one each in June, July, and August.

Dens: Dens with an average attendance of at least half their members at the three summer pack events are eligible for a colorful den participation ribbon. 

Individuals: Boys who participate in all three pack events are eligible to receive the National Summertime Pack Award pin, which they can wear on the right pocket flap of their uniform. This is an individual recognition for boys, not adults. The pin is worn permanently on the right pocket flap of the Cub Scout Uniform, pinned onto the Cub Scout Outdoor Activity Award, if present. This is one of the few awards that can be earned each year of Cub Scouts.


Outdoor Achievement Award
Cub Scouts can earn the Cub Scout Outdoor Activity Award in each of the program years as long as the requirements are completed each year. The first time the award is earned, the boy will receive the pocket flap award, which is to be worn on the right pocket flap of the uniform shirt. Each successive time the award is earned, a Wolf Track pin may be added to the flap.

All Ranks: Attend Cub Scout day camp or Cub Scout/Webelos Scout resident camp. Additionally, complete the rank-­‐specific requirements as follows:

Tiger Scouts: Complete the "Backyard Jungle" adventure, and complete four of the outdoor activities listed below.

Wolf Scouts: Complete the "Paws on the Path" adventure, and complete five of the outdoor activities listed below.

Bear Scouts: Complete the “Bear Necessities” adventure, and complete six of the outdoor activities listed below.

Webelos Scouts: Complete the "Webelos Walkabout" adventure, and complete seven of the outdoor activities listed below.

Outdoor Activities: These activities must be in addition to any similar activities counted toward rank advancement and can be accomplished as a family, a den, or a pack.

  1. Participate in a nature hike in your local area. This can be on an organized, marked trail, or just a hike to observe nature in your area.
  2. Participate in an outdoor activity such as a picnic or a fun day in a park.
  3. Explain the buddy system, and tell what to do if lost. Explain the importance of cooperation.
  4. Attend a pack overnighter. Be responsible by being prepared for the event.
  5. Complete an outdoor service project in your community.
  6. Complete a nature/conservation project in your area. This project should involve improving, beautifying, or supporting natural habitats. Discuss how this project helped you to respect nature.
  7. Participate in your pack’s earning the Summertime Pack Award.
  8. Participate in a nature observation activity. Describe or illustrate and display your observations at a den pack meeting.
  9. Participate in an outdoor aquatics activity. This can be an organized swim meet or just a den, pack, or family swim.
  10. Participate in an outdoor campfire program. Perform in a skit, sing a song, or take part in a ceremony.
  11. Participate in an outdoor sporting event.
  12. Participate in an outdoor Scouts Own or other worship service.
  13. Explore a local city, county, state, or national park. Discuss with your den how a good citizen obeys park rules.
  14. Invent an outside game, and play it outside with friends for 30 minutes.

World Conservation Award

The World Conservation Award provides an opportunity for individual Wolf Scouts, Bear Scouts, Webelos Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers to “think globally” and “act locally” to preserve and improve our environment. This program is designed to make youth members aware that all nations are closely related through natural resources, and that we and our world environment are interdependent.

Requirements for this award must be completed in addition to any similar requirements completed for rank. You may earn the World Conservation Award by doing the following:

Wolf Scouts:

  1. Earn the "Paws on the Path" adventure.
  2. Earn the "Grow Something" adventure.
  3. Complete requirements 1 and 2 from the "Spirit of the Water" adventure.
  4. Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above.
Bear Scouts:
  1. Earn the "Fur, Feathers, and Ferns" adventure.
  2. Earn either the "Bear Goes Fishing" or "Critter Care" adventure.
  3. Complete requirement 3 from the "Baloo the Builder" adventure by constructing a bird feeder or a bird house as one of the options.
  4. Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above.
Webelos Scouts: (Including Boys Earning Arrow of Light Rank)
  1. Earn the "Building a Better World" adventure.
  2. Earn the "Into the Wild" adventure.
  3. Earn the "Into the Woods" adventure.
  4. Earn the "Earth Rocks" adventure.
  5. Complete requirements 1, 3a, and 3b in the "Adventures in Science" adventure.
  6. Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above

Emergency Preparedness



From its beginning, the Scouting movement has taught young people to do their best, to do their duty to God and country, to help others, and to prepare themselves physically, mentally, and morally to meet these goals. The basic aims of Scouting include teaching young people to take care of themselves, to be helpful to others, and to develop courage, self-reliance, and the ability to be ready to serve in an emergency.

The Emergency Preparedness BSA Award, first introduced in 2003 and updated in 2014, was designed with the aims mentioned above in mind. The award has been earned by tens of thousands of Scouts and Scouters individually, with their unit, or at a large event such as a jamboree. By developing these lifelong skills, Scouts have been instrumental in helping their communities recover from emergencies. 

When an emergency does occur, it can affect every BSA youth and adult member in the immediate area. Earning the award teaches participants to respond first, as an individual; second, as a member of a family; and third, as a member of a Scouting unit serving their neighborhood and community. This award will allow all Scouts and Scouters to become informed, be prepared, and act promptly and appropriately in the event of emergencies, whether they are natural or man-made.Individual Emergency Preparedness Award Requirements

Tiger Scouts:

  1. Cover a family fire plan and drill, and what to do if separated from the family.
  2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.
  3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
  4. Take a nationally recognized first-aid course geared toward children such as American Red Cross First Aid for Children Today (FACT).
  5. Join a safe kids program such as McGruff Child Identification, Internet Safety, or Safety at Home.
  6. Show and tell your family household what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Wolf Scouts:

  1. Create a checklist to keep your home safe.
  2. Discuss a family emergency plan with the family.
  3. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
  4. Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
  5. Join a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
  6. Make a presentation to your family on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.

Bear Scouts:

  1. Create, plan, and practice summoning help during an emergency.
  2. Learn how to shut off utilities to your home in an emergency.
  3. Learn simple rescue techniques.
  4. Learn emergency skills and care for choking, wounds, nosebleeds, falls, and animal bites. The emergency skills should include responses for fire safety, poisoning, water accidents, substance abuse, and more.
  5. Put together a family emergency kit for use in the home.
  6. Organize a safe kids program such as the McGruff Child Identification program. Put on a training program for your family or den on stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
  7. Make a small display or give a presentation for your family or den on what you have learned about preparing for emergencies.
Webelos Scouts:
  1. Learn rescue techniques.
  2. Build a family emergency kit, with an adult family member participating in the project.
  3. Take a first-aid course.
  4. Learn to survive extreme weather situations.
  5. Learn about stranger awareness, Internet safety, or safety at home.
  6. Give a presentation to your den on preparing for emergencies.

Religious Emblem

PurposeTo recognize youth and adults who demonstrate faith, observe the creeds or principles of the faith, and give service. Many religious-faith groups have programs for individual Cub Scouts. Religious emblems are not Scouting awards; they are presented by religious groups to boys who earn them.

DescriptionThis is a special award that can be worn permanently above the left pocket and transferred to Boy Scout and Adult uniforms

EligibilityTigers, Wolves, Bears, Webelos, Boy Scouts, and Venturers

Requirements: Varies by religion. Pastor Curtis conducts a God and Me (Tigers, Wolves & Bears) and God and Family (Webelos) program.


The Recruiter Strip
This is awarded the first time a scout is successful in getting a friend, relative, classmate, or other acquaintance to join the Pack. It is worn permanently below the right pocket.


Messenger of Peace
Purpose: To inspire more young men and women to help Scouting create a better world

DescriptionIn 1920, just two years after the most terrible war the world had ever known, 8,000 Scouts from 34 countries came together for the first world jamboree. At the closing ceremony, Scouting founder Robert Baden-Powell called on participants to carry the spirit of the jamboree home “so that we may help to develop peace and happiness in the world and goodwill among all Scouts.”  

Scouts who complete Messenger of Peace Projects will be eligible for a special recognition: a ring patch that is worn permanently around the World Crest to symbolize their participation in an ever-widening circle of Scouts who are not just visualizing world peace but are helping to make it a reality.

RequirementsGo online and register the Messenger of Peach related community service projects they undertake. Doing so adds pins to a global Messengers of Peace map, which Scouts from around the world can click on to learn how their fellow Scouts are making a difference.


Outdoor Ethics Awareness Award





























PurposeTo encourage Scouts to learn more about outdoor ethics and Leave No Trace 

Description: This award can be worn as a temporary patch on the right pocket

Eligibility: Cub Scouts & Adult Leaders

Requirements

  1. Describe what the Outdoor Code means to you.
  2. Complete the Leave No Trace online course  and print the certificate.
  3. Complete the Tread Lightly! TL! Kids Outdoor Quiz and print the certificate. Click on the "Outdoor Quiz" arrow.
  4. Participate in an outdoor ethics activity facilitated by a person who has completed the BSA outdoor ethics orientation course or is a BSA outdoor ethics trainer or master.

Outdoor Ethics Action Name badge




























PurposeTo reward those who wish to deepen their understanding of outdoor ethics and improve their skills in implementing those outdoor ethics 

DescriptionThis name badge bearing the BSA outdoor ethics insignia also has the appropriate insignia for each program division level that a youth completes. 

EligibilityCub Scouts & Adult Leaders

Requirements (Cub Scouts)

  1. Do the following:
    • Earn the Outdoor Ethics Awareness Award.
    • Describe to your den leader or parent/guardian what the Leave No Trace front country guidelines mean to you.
  2. Boys in a Tiger Cub den complete the activities for Achievement 5, "Let's Go Outdoors"; boys in a Wolf den complete Requirement 7, "Your Living World"; boys in a Bear den complete Requirement 12, "Family Outdoor Adventures"; boys in a Webelos den earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
  3. Complete one of the following:
    • With your family, put on a short activity (such as a skit or demonstration) at an outdoor activity or den meeting on a principle of Leave No Trace or Tread Lightly!
    • With your den, put on a short activity (such as a skit or demonstration) at an outdoor activity or pack meeting on a principle of Leave No Trace or Tread Lightly!
  4. Follow the Leave No Trace principles or frontcountry guidelines on three outings. Explain to your unit leader or an individual who has completed the BSA outdoor ethics orientation course one thing you did on each outdoor activity to Leave No Trace.
  5. On a pack or den outing, participate in a service project that reduces impact from our use of the outdoors. Examples might be collecting litter, cleaning fire rings or grills, or other activities approved by the landowner or land manager.
  6. With your family or den, make a poster about the skill you learned in Requirement 3 or the project you did in Requirement 4 and display it at your pack meeting.